• Force for Good team

Saving wildlife

Updated: 2 days ago

The causes we have chosen to support within Force for Good, align with the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), adopted by all United Nations Member states in 2015. These are an urgent call for action by all countries - developed and developing - to join in global partnership and tackle some of the world’s most pressing issues. These Sustainable Development Goals are the blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all and addresses the global challenges that are faced by all human beings, including poverty, inequality, climate change, environmental degradation, peace and justice.


UN SDG #15: Life on Land

Why save wildlife?

Nature is critical to our survival: nature provides us with our oxygen, regulates our weather patterns, pollinates our crops, produces our food, feed and fiber. But it is under increasing stress. Human activity has altered almost 75% of the earth’s surface, squeezing wildlife and nature into an ever-smaller corner of the planet.


Around 1 million animal and plant species are threatened with extinction – many within decades – according to the 2019 Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service. The report called for transformative changes to restore and protect nature. It found that the health of ecosystems on which we and all other species depend is deteriorating more rapidly than ever, affecting the very foundations of our economies, livelihoods, food security, health, and quality of life worldwide.


Deforestation and desertification – caused by human activities and climate change – pose major challenges to sustainable development and have affected the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Forests are vitally important for sustaining life on Earth and play a major role in the fight against climate change. And investing in land restoration is critical for improving livelihoods, reducing vulnerabilities, and reducing risks for the economy.


The health of our planet also plays an important role in the emergence of zoonotic diseases, i.e. diseases that are transmissible between animals and humans. As we continue to encroach on fragile ecosystems, we bring humans into ever-greater contact with wildlife, enabling pathogens in wildlife to spill over to livestock and humans, increasing the risk of disease emergence and amplification.


The key facts:

● There are now 785 extinct species and a further 65 in captivity only.

● 27% of all animals are still in jeopardy of extinction.

● Surging wildlife crime, land use changes and habitat encroachment are primary pathways of transmission for emerging infectious diseases, threatening public health and the world economy.

● 12 million hectares of tree cover in the tropics was lost in 2020 alone.

● Moreover, 75% of emerging infectious diseases are transmitted from wildlife to people - transmission occurring through human contact with affected wildlife and tends to happen during activities such as wildlife trafficking.


Related Force for Good Causes:

Animals & Wildlife / Sustainability / Local Communities / Sports / Business & Innovation / Climate Change & Conservation



United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals